Let us be sacrificers, but not butchers, Caius. We all stand up against the spirit of Caesar, And in the spirit of men there is no blood.

Read the excerpt from act 2, scene 1, of Julius Caesar.

[BRUTUS.] Let us be sacrificers, but not butchers, Caius.
We all stand up against the spirit of Caesar,
And in the spirit of men there is no blood.
O, that we then could come by Caesar’s spirit,
And not dismember Caesar!
Why is this passage an example of verbal irony?
Brutus wants to stand up to the spirit of Caesar.
Brutus is the one the priests call on to offer sacrifices to the gods.
O Brutus says he does not want to be seen as a butcher, but that is what the Romans will remember after he stabs
his friend
O Brutus and Caius do not believe in spirits or in the gods.